A creative process

Though much of my surface pattern design work involves a computer and software, I like the art work itself to start off in the normal way – by hand. 

For a while I’ve been interested to see how a Lino carving could translate to a pattern. And I also had a gap in my knowledge about how to put together pattern repeats. In particular I wanted to create a half drop pattern, which is very commonly used as it’s the most pleasing to the eye. 

So here’s how this particular process went:

The original drawing, inspired by a gorgeous little wren who visits my garden most evenings at dusk, he seems to especially like the clematis montana. 

 

And during carving, having been transferred to a block: 


And, after several hours at the computer huffing and puffing and generally getting cross, re-doing my calculations, I finally get a seamless matching repeat pattern.


What I love about this is how a single rectangle Lino block can give such movement and rhythm to a pattern. And I love the simplicity of white on Wedgwood blue. Monochromatic colour schemes have such impact I think. 

I actually did around 12 colour ways for this, but here are my favourites 



Generally I like more muted colours. Overly saturated colours look like they’re straight out of the tube (my pet peeve in painting). However, this yellow, so rich and bright and summery would make a lovely tea towel I think. 

Advertisements